Shropshire Hills Guidebooks

Shropshire Hills Guidebooks and Maps

Below, RambleFest displays details of Shropshire Hills guidebooks and maps, and provides the facility for buying them online.

The Shropshire Hills is a distinctive area of the Anglo-Welsh borders where remote upland merges into pastoral lowland. The AONB’s parallel hills and valleys run southwest, northeast with the strike of the rocks forming the Long Mynd and Stiperstones, Clun Forest, the Clee Hills, Stretton Hills and The Wrekin, five distinctive upland areas each with their own landscape character.
The steep-sided rift valley of Church Stretton lies at the centre of the AONB and from its fertile farmed floor looms the great pre-Cambrian moorland ridge of the Long Mynd. The unmistakable peak of the Wrekin is a volcanic outlier and the lonely sandstone Clee Hills owe their rounded mass to a basalt cap. In contrast, the limestone outcrop of Wenlock Edge has an altogether softer, wooded character.

Shropshire Hills Guidebooks

We display the rambling books we have found, plus one or two others which might be of interest to those visiting the area. We welcome suggestions for inclusion.
See also our Shropshire and Shropshire Way pages.

Shropshire Hills Guidebook

Shropshire Hills Guidebook

“Guidebook to 32 walks in the hills of Shropshire. The walks, which are graded easy, moderate or hard, range from 3 miles (5km) to 12 miles (19km) and can be walked in all seasons. The selected routes take in highlights such as The Wrekin, Wenlock Edge, Long Mynd and Stiperstones, Castle Ring and Bury Ditches. Featuring 1:50K OS mapping (shown at 1:40K for greater clarity), step-by-step route descriptions, as well as information on accommodation, getting around, bases for the Shropshire hills and history of the region, the guide details everything you need to walk in Shropshire – and more. From Neolithic standing stones, Bronze Age stone circles, and hilltop forts dating back to the Iron Age, Shropshire offers more than just picturesque landscapes and rewarding walking. Discover history on the hills as well as natural beauty, all within easy driving distance from Birmingham and Manchester.”
– Hillwalking in Shropshire: 32 Hill and Country Walks

 

Shropshire Hills Guidebooks

Shropshire Hills Guidebooks

“Whether a “Sunday stroller” or a more enthusiastic walker, Shropshire has plenty to offer by way of varied walks, many of them taking in upland landscapes with breathtaking views. Shropshire is England’s largest land-locked county, and you can find walks here where often you will not be troubled by another soul, as well as places with delightfully cosy tea shops and pubs for those who prefer a little company.
This handy book contains detailed routes and images of 10 walks in a variety of locations around the county, ranging from the dramatic hills of the south to the gentler, but no less scenic landscapes around the Shrewsbury and Shifnal areas.The walks suit the needs of families, groups of friends or individuals looking for a gentle stroll or a longer walk, and reflect the many varied facets of the area, its people, its history, and its landscape, and will help first time visitors to experience some of the great scenery the area has to offer.
With Bob Caddick’s photographs providing visual inspiration and well researched walks compiled by Bob Alton, this work will provide expert guidance for those seeking to get out and about, but who don’t quite know where to go for the best views or easiest access to the countryside.”
Boot Up Shropshire Hills, by Bob Caddick, Bob Alton.

 

Shropshire Hills Guidebook

Shropshire Hills Guidebook

“The Shropshire Hills are alive with stories, although all too few of these are known to the casual visitor or even to the interested long-term resident. But each year, a lucky few will hear these weird and wonderful tales as they accompany landscape detective Keith Pybus on his walks around this Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Now, for the first time, these stories have been committed to print for all to enjoy. Follow in the footsteps of A.E. Housman, Mary Webb, Bruce Chatwin and John Osborne to rediscover this lovely part of England. Meet three local ‘Grand Designers’ and explore the mansions they built with the fortunes they made. Find out what brought Napoleon Bonaparte’s brother, Lucien, to the Ludlow social scene. Read the hair-raising tale of Molly Morgan, twice sentenced to transportation. Ponder over the mysterious case of the wretched maid of Ferney Hall. Ache at the heart-wrenching stories of children banished to the New World on the Mayflower. Stories that will surprise and move you and make you want to find out more about the Shropshire Hills. Of course, explorations are not just into the past. Every year thousands of ‘foodies’ attend the Ludlow Food Festival, and its markets and restaurants could not exist without the unique and varied produce of local farms, moors and hedgerows. Church Stretton, Shropshire’s very own spa town was once promoted as ‘Switzerland without wolves and avalanches’. And Rectory Wood was recently voted the least stressful location in England. So join Keith Pybus on an unforgettable adventure through the Shropshire Hills in all their glory. Feel the breeze in your hair, just as you feel the history at your back.”
– Blue Remembered Hills: The Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

Shropshire Hills Maps

The Ordnance Survey `Explorer’ maps are available in standard quality (shown) as well as the all-weather type.

Click on an image below for more information on the Shropshire Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty guidebooks and maps, and the option of buying online: