North Devon Guidebooks

North Devon Guidebooks and Maps

Below, RambleFest displays details of North Devon guidebooks and maps, and provides the facility for buying them online.

North Devon Guidebook

North Devon Guidebook

Stretching west and south from Coombe Martin to the Cornish border, North Devon AONB contains some of the finest cliff scenery in Britain. In the north, steeply dipping rocks form hogsback cliffs in a natural continuation of Exmoor’s coastline. Turning south, Hartland Point’s dark, sheer crags and razor-like reefs are the coast at its sternest. The AONB also reaches inland to take in the cliff top plateau around Hartland. This is scored by deep valleys which reach the coast as steep hanging gaps in the cliffs, often foaming with spectacular coastal waterfalls.
In contrast, the AONB includes the broad sweep of Barnstaple Bay, the surfing beaches of Westward Ho! and the huge dune systems of Braunton Burrows on the Taw and Torridge Estuary. The AONB boundary takes in picturesque fishing hamlets, including tiny ‘honey pot’ Clovelly.

North Devon Guidebooks

We display rambling books, some of which are out of print but available from third-parties via Amazon. See also our Exmoor National Park and Devon pages. We welcome suggestions for inclusion.

North Devon Guidebook

North Devon Guidebook

“Are you planning a visit or holiday to North or Mid Devon? Do you enjoy a walk in the country or a leisurely afternoon stroll? Inside the Pathfinder Guide to North and Mid Devon are 28 fantastic country walks designed for walkers of all abilities. Ranging from 3 to 11 1/ 2 miles in length, each circular walk takes in some of the many delights of the North and Mid Devon countryside – known for its dramatic coastline, wide sandy bays and woodland that runs right to the cliff edge. Pathfinder(R) Guide to North and Mid Devon contains walks along the South West Coast Path between Foreland Point and Marsland Mouth as well as walks that offer the opportunity to visit some more unusual locations such as Lundy Island. Pathfinder(R) Guide to North and Mid Devon lets the walker enjoy some of the best walking destinations in the county, from the Two Moors Way and the Tarka Trail to the Exe Valley and the ever-popular Clovelly and the Valley of Rocks. From the Hartland promontory and Heddon’s Mouth to the calm tranquillity of Bideford Bay and Braunton Burrows, each walk in Pathfinder(R) Guide to North and Mid Devon is accompanied by clear, large-scale Ordnance Survey route maps and GPS waypoints to help you navigate your hike with ease. There is also a wealth of useful information accompanying each walk, including good pubs nearby, where to park before you start your walk and places of interest en route. Pathfinder(R) Guides are Britain’s best loved walking guides. Made with durable covers, they are the perfect companion for countryside walks throughout Britain. Each title features circular walks with easy-to-follow route descriptions, tried and tested by seasoned walkers and accompanied by beautiful photography and clear Ordnance Survey mapping. The routes range from extended strolls to exhilarating hikes, so there is something for everyone.”
– North and Mid Devon: Outstanding Circular Walks (Pathfinder)

North Devon Guidebook

North Devon Guidebook

“North Devon is a rural landscape of small villages, rich pastures, secluded coves, long sandy beaches, and in its west and east corners, are high cliffs which fall precipitously to the sea. It is bordered, in the east, by the Exmoor National Park, and some of these walks are within the Park. In the middle section is Braunton Burrows, designated a World Heritage Site by UNESCO. It is arguably one of the most beautiful corners of England. Much of the coastline is owned by the National Trust who protect and manage it for future generations. Inland the countryside is a tapestry of patchwork fields and high hedgerows protecting narrow country lanes. Stretching southwards from the two ports of Barnstaple and Bideford is a gentle pastoral countryside known as The Land of the Two Rivers (Torridge and Taw), which was so vividly brought to life in the works of Henry Williamson. This is superb walking country: spectacular coastal views, long horizons inland towards Exmoor, a wealth of wildlife, wild flowers and old tracks. These routes were walked and researched in the winter after long spells of heavy rain, and are thus all passable throughout the year. Stout, waterproof footwear is advised although training shoes are adequate during the summer months. North Devon has a micro-climate of almost tropical dimensions. When it pours, it can pour in stair rods but when it clears, the sun shines brilliantly and the earth smells sweetly of the scent of grass and wild flowers. The routes are in the main categorised as easy, easy-medium or medium, none are too difficult or strenuous. As they all follow part of the coastal footpath (which undulates), a modicum of fitness is necessary. The time allowed is generous. For the very fit subtract thirty minutes from each route. For the casual stroller add thirty minutes. Time for lunch or picnic stops have not been included. The design of our maps is such that we have bypassed the need, or use, of an Ordnance Survey map.”
North Devon Coastal Walks, by William Fricker

North Devon Maps

The Ordnance Survey `Explorer’ maps are available in standard quality (shown) as well as the all-weather type.

Click on an image below for more information on the North Devon Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty guidebooks and maps, and the option of buying online:


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