Lleyn Guidebooks

Lleyn Guidebooks and Maps

Below, RambleFest displays Lleyn guidebooks and maps, and provides the facility for buying them online.

Lleyn Guidebook

Lleyn Guidebook

Nowhere is far from the sea on the long, low peninsula of Lleyn, North Wales, which is famous for the unspoilt beauty of its coastline. The AONB, covering a quarter of the peninsula, is largely coastal, but extends inland to take in the volcanic domes which punctuate the plateau.
Lleyn’s highest points are the north’s abrupt volcanic peaks dominated by the granite crags of Yr Eifl (564m). At its foot, a landscape of hedged fields and rough pastures rolls out towards the sea and finally to the sheer black cliffs of Mynydd Mawr, the tip of the peninsula. The countryside is characterised by its narrow lanes and white-washed farms and includes stretches of ancient open common.

Lleyn Guidebooks

We display rambling books, some of which are out of print but still available from third-parties via Amazon. We also include a book on steam trains of the area. We welcome suggestions for inclusion.

Lleyn Guidebook

Lleyn Guidebook

“This attractive and cleverly structured guidebook gives walkers the ten finest routes along a section of the new Wales Coast Path, officially opened in May 2012, in a popular pocketable format. With clear information, an overview and introduction for each walk, expertly written numbered directions, Ordnance Survey maps, superb, eye-grabbing panoramic photographs, and interpretation of points of interest along the way, these guides set a new standard in clarity and ease-of-use. Featured walks include: Dinas Dinlle, Porth Dinllaen, Tudweiliog, Whistling Sands, Aberdaron, Mynydd Rhiw, Abersoch, Criccieth & Porthmadog.”
Lleyn Peninsula: Circular Walks from the Wales Coast Path, by Carl Rogers

Lleyn Guidebook

Lleyn Guidebook

“This is a spectacular collection of photographs, showing this beautiful welsh region at its most extraordinary and unspoilt best. Historic towns, quaint fishing villages, Iron Age forts and standing stones, these captivating images will delight both tourists to the area and proud locals. The Lleyn Peninsula, the arm in the Irish Sea extends some 30 miles west from Snowdonia in North West Wales. An extraordinary landscape of beautiful fishing villages and historic towns, where ancient tracks can still to be found, the landscape enhanced by numerous white-washed farms and a patchwork of enclosed fields. No more than 8 miles wide giving easy access to the contrasting north and south coasts, designated an area of outstanding natural beauty in 1956. Iron Age hill forts, Neolithic tombs, standing stones are all to be found and due to the remoteness of the area it has remained unspoilt. Connected to the mainland by the splendour of Thomas Telford’s suspension bridge opened in 1823, as a result of the act of union, is the Isle of Anglesey Sir Ynys Mon. Anglesey has over 100 miles of diverse coastal environment ranging from sea cliffs, salt marshes, dunes and mud flats all providing a spectacular habitat for a variety of birds plants and wildlife. Edward I iron ring was completed with the building of a castle at Beaumaris overlooking the Menai Strait and the mountains of Snowdonia with Beaumaris today a main yachting centre. Welsh is a very descriptive language and the spelling of place names can vary between maps so I have used the latest ordnance survey maps as a point of reference.”
–¬†Discovering the Lleyn Peninsula and Anglesey

 

Lleyn Maps

The Ordnance Survey `Explorer’ maps are available in standard quality (shown) as well as the all-weather type.

Click on an image below for more information on the Lleyn Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty guidebooks and maps, and the option of buying online:


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